3 Questions to Ask Before Quitting Your Job

Feb
3rd

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So you’re thinking of quitting your job, huh?

Leaving your job can be pretty scary, and if you’re quitting it to start your own business, well friends, it’s basically the most terrifying thing in the world. That being said, it can also be the most liberating.

One of the biggest decisions of my life was to leave my well-paying job in PR to go off on my own and start This Renegade Love. Even though I loved the brand I worked for and the people I worked with, I was miserable. I woke up every morning dreading the day ahead and felt like I wasn’t able to live up to my potential.  I can remember going into my boss’ office (who was also a friend of mine) to tell her I was leaving and the next feeling being ‘Oh god WTF HAVE I DONE?”. I was living in the UK without a job prospect or a network of people to throw me a bone.

It’s not an easy choice to make and it’s not always going to be an easy adjustment period. I went from making mo’ money to making NO money. From nights out to Netflix and noodles on the couch. From people relying on me daily to not a damn person caring what my day-to-day was. The only person checking in on me WAS me – I had to hustle hard to start making money off of an idea that I thought had legs.

Related: How to Build a Kick-Ass Freelance Career

But here’s the thing – it has been the best decision I’ve ever made. And when I had previously moved from editorial into PR, it was another decision I’ve never regretted. I was prepared. I thought about it rationally. I made a plan. And I was honest with myself and about what my goals were for the future.

So if you’re considering making the move, whether it’s to start your own business or start at a new company, do just that – consider it. Ask yourself these three questions before quitting your job, then take a deep breath, because your world’s about to change for the better, baby.

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1) Why do I want to quit?

Before you actually make the big move, ask yourself the reasons for wanting to quit. Do you not like your boss? Is the work not challenging enough? Are you not making enough money? Sometimes it’s just a matter of talking to your boss or HR and getting things resolved. You never want to leave your job based on a bad day or out of fear of confrontation about what you need from the company in order to succeed. In my previous job, although I liked my colleagues and the brand, there was too much red-tape and micro-managing decisions being made from above – when I approached my boss about the things I’d need to change in order for me to do my job properly, her hands were tied. She did all she could within her power to get me to stay, but at the end of the day, I knew that nothing would change because the wrong people were making decisions… and that was my cue to leave.

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2) Can I afford it financially?

Listen, as much as I wanna be that super inspirational person and say, “Take the risk and follow your dreams”, there’s a little thing called reality, and not having a steady cash flow isn’t always an option for everyone. Some people have families, debt, mortgages and health issues. But don’t let this hold you back – just make a financial plan! Cut back on all your lifestyle luxuries (studio classes, morning lattes, travel, eating out) and save enough for three months of living without a cash flow coming in – enough for housing, food and bills while you take a breather and figure shit out. This will be a small sacrifice for being able to leave a daily grind that has you unfulfilled.

That being said, if you are absolutely f*cking MISERABLE in your job and it’s a toxic space that is affecting your well-being, just get out. Take a part-time gig somewhere if you just need to make ends meet while you look for something else or work on a passion project. Nothing is worth compromising your mental or physical health.

Related: Six Things Holding You Back From Success

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3) What do I want to do next?

This is where a lot of people muck up. They think they need to have a job to go to immediately after, and so they naturally look for jobs similar to the one they’re leaving. But this is your chance to make a change! Quitting your job gives you the freedom to choose your next path, whether that’s trying something entirely new, going back to school, starting your own business, or – if it is within the same field – taking on a different role that challenges you. Before rushing into a new job because you’re worried about being broke for awhile, take the time to plan your next step. Think about your ideal career, your ideal position, and start planning out the necessary steps to get there. Life is way too short to be stuck in a job that doesn’t excite you, in a field that doesn’t fulfill you.

Related: How to Craft the Perfect Resume

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LET’S CHAT!

Let me know in the comments below if:

– You recently quit a job that left you unfulfilled.
– You’re working up the courage to leave your current job.
– You have another question we should be asking ourselves!


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  • Natalie says:

    This is such great advice. I quit my job earlier last year because the work environment was toxic and was really (like REALLY) detrimental to my mental health. There was no room for growth, and management did nothing to address the issues that were brought up numerous times. I had about a year’s worth of salary saved up when I quit, so I spent the rest of the year travelling and to really take care of my mental health. It also gave me time to evaluate whether or not I’d continue to be happy in the industry I was in, and when I realized I wouldn’t be, I realized it was the perfect opportunity for me to go after a more creative path that I was always interested in but hesitant to pursue.

    Quitting was a difficult decision, but I’m so glad I finally did it. As scary as it is to be unemployed, I’m so much happier and in such a better place now!

  • Jane says:

    Thank you so much for writing this post. I’m contemplating leaving a job without anything lined up. I want to pursue a side project and am working up the courage to put in my notice, and am carefully thinking through the decision without being rash. Reading your post reminds me I’m not the only one considering such a drastic change. A change the majority would scoff at. At the end of the day my wellbeing takes top priority, and no amount of money should hold it hostage.

    My question is how do you stay motivated to work without needing to really “answer” to somebody?